22 April 2013

Article about Fear claiming to be about Fisheries

Article about the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam from Egypt, posted below and linked here.

This article is strange. I am not sure that I understand where the data - the figures presented - are being taken from. The GERD, as far as I understand, is not going to alter any flow from the Blue Nile river. It is an impoundment dam that holds back water in a reservoir to generate hydroelectricity. It is not a diversion dam. In order to generate electricity, water needs to be released. Nor is it possible, in my honest opinion, to hold back so much water to reduce the flow to Egypt and Sudan as stated.
Also, if this really were the case, this is a technical matter that can be resolved by water managers in the three countries. Why the fear? If the Blue Nile is to have dams developed, like GERD, coordination between countries on these matters is of upmost importance.
The other troubling thing about this article is that it says nothing really about the authority of the woman who is quoted expert field: fisheries. Is this person making a political statement or one that holds concern for her field of expertise? If the GERD is going to impact fisheries downstream, tell us how and where. Perhaps this information is needed to make further discussions possible, to bring up issues that may have been missed to date. It seems the only concrete thing that is raised is a loss in hydropower production. But are the dams in question running at full capacity now?

I am not sure that this article holds any real information worth publishing, but rather fear. But that, in itself, is an important issue to consider.


More is "understood" or "known" about the GERD through perception than through reality.

Fisheries Authority concerned by Ethiopian dam



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Fisheries Authority head: ‘Egypt is facing a real disaster’
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Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres. (AFP Photo)
Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres.
(AFP Photo)
Head of the Fisheries Authority Amani Ismail has warned of the threat posed to Egypt by the construction of a dam in Ethiopia.
Writing on the authority’s official website, Ismail said: “There is no longer room for doubt that Egypt is facing a real disaster in the coming months.” She said that the impending disaster is a result of the Minister of Water Resources and Irrigation Mohamed Baha’a El-Din’s recognition of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) project.
Ismail highlighted that the GERD will change the course of the Blue Nile, a tributary of the Nile. She believes that this will cause Egypt and Sudan to lose out on 18m cubic metres of water and reduce the electricity produced by the Aswan Dam by approximately 25%-30%.
Ismail accused the governments of President Mohamed Morsi and former president Hosni Mubarak of not taking action to prevent these losses.
Ismail’s criticisms come after Baha’a El-Din asserted that Egypt is committed to fair distribution of the water from the Nile.
The GERD has led to strained relations with Sudan and Egypt, as it will greatly reduce the amount of water flow and consequentially reduce their share of Nile water.
In September 2012 Egypt denied allegations of a plot to bomb the GERD. The story was printed by a Sudanese newspaper that cited whistle-blowing website WikiLeaks as a source.
Egypt has long received the largest share of the water from the Nile, as per agreements signed in 1929 and 1959, which guaranteed Egypt 55.5bn cubic metres annually of the estimated total of 84bn cubic metres.
Egypt has held a number of meetings and consultations on the issue, including talks with Burundi and Sudan. In January, Egypt refused to sign the Entebbe agreement with other Nile-basin countries. Baha’a El-Din claimed that it was not suitable for downstream countries like Egypt.